...If you are looking for even more protections, may we suggest augmenting your facial mask protocol with a lip sanitizer. Lips are important and form a quite necessary aperture for the enjoyment of wine. To exclude lips from the first line of defense seems to leave open a pathway to potential infection. To help provide a first line of protection for your lips we suggest Pinot in Pink Rosé as a home remedy lip sanitizer. Note: The effectiveness of Pinot in Pink Rosé as a home remedy lip sanitizer has not been proven, studied or even contemplated...

Follow this link to read the full Lip Sanitizer & 2020 Spring Cellar Report - Vegan Edition

​​A Few Seconds

with Ernie ​at

Amalie Robert Estate

Amalie Robert FLOG (Farming bLOG)

​Vinous Edition 2020 - All reviews are by Josh Raynolds of Vinous Media from May, August and September 2020. There are all manner of wine reviewers out there, and then there is Vinous Media. Club 95.  This is the first year we have gained admittance to

The Cellar Door is open year round by appointment for private tastings, tours & purchases, weather and harvest conditions permitting.

Click here to request an appointment

I strongly encourage readers to benefit from the delightfully scripted insights into viticulture and winemaking that form the "climate update" blog on Amalie Robert's website, charting the entire winery year.
                                   ​                                                                            - ​David Schildknecht​​

Feature Story

Follow this link to read the full Amalie Robert Estate Climate Update: August 2020

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Cellar Door Event

Our multi-level, gravity flow winery is comprised of 1,200 tons of concrete, mostly underground. Our Pinot Noirs are fermented with whole clusters, indigenous yeast and are barrel aged and blended for complexity and age worthiness.

Amalie Robert Estate was founded by Dena Drews and Ernie Pink in 1999. Winemaking is our second careers and the guiding principle is stewardship. We are the vineyard managers and winemakers. And what’s the story behind the name?

Amalie Robert is a combination of Dena’s middle name, “Amalie” (pronounced AIM-a-lee) and Ernie’s, “Robert.” We are the “A” team.

Portfolio Update: Vinous Edition 2020

"...for fans of the delicate, graceful school of Pinot Noir, which is decidedly the style that’s emphasized here. A wide range of wines, almost entirely Pinot Noir, are made from the 35 acres of estate vines, and Drews and Pink aren’t afraid to hold them back for late or successive releases depending on the personality of each individual bottling. In warm vintages the effects of the weather expresse themselves on the wines here, but rarely do they head into dark fruit territory, even in years like 2012. "                                                              - Josh Raynolds, Vinous, December 2016

Our adventure with Pinot Noir began in a Parisian café not far from the Eiffel Tower. A great meal and an ethereal bottle of Red Burgundy set us on the path to create Amalie Robert Estate. Our Pinot Noir Groove.

"Bob, I think I got here too late. You have your cherry orchard on top of my vineyard!" At the turn of the century we found an old cherry orchard sitting atop of what we believe is the last best place to grow Pinot Noir. We farmed cherries that first year and paid attention to what the land had to say.

Fast forward to today and Amalie Robert Estate is 55,000 vines covering 35 acres stitched into the sedimentary soils just outside of Dallas, Oregon. We sustainably farm our vineyard and only use Estate grown fruit for Amalie Robert Estate wines.

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Amalie Robert on Twitter

this exclusive collection of wines. We have three entries from two vintages.

Follow this link to read more: Portfolio Update: Vinous Edition 2020

From the Chief Farming Officer's seat during the Great Cluster Pluck

Amalie Robert Estate Climate Update: August 2020

The Great Cluster Pluck, vintage 2020 is coming into view. Good things might come to those who wait, but not for those who wait too late. In other words, are we there yet?

The month of August was fairly temperate. Nothing really out of the ordinary from the last 30 year moving average – and that was quite nice. No rain, but that is just fine for our silty clay loam soils, known as Bellpine Series. These are marine sediment-based soils and they are quite miserly with their available soil moisture. In other words, they don’t give it up easily.